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April 23, 2021

Governance and COVID-19: Implications for Future Health Security Policy

Event Series: Global Health Security Seminars

Governance and COVID-19: Implications for Future Health Security Policy Video Player

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As the world moves into a new sense of normalcy post-COVID-19, we reflect on the lessons we’ve learned, and ask how we can apply them to create a better prepared, more secure world. While it’s clear that governance played a huge role in pandemic response effectiveness, the diverse sets of challenges that governments faced can make the solutions unclear. This seminar grappled with these questions through three presentations followed by a moderated discussion from undergraduate and graduate student researchers working at the Center for Global Health Science and Security. Combining policy data from the COVID Analysis and Mapping of Policies (AMP) and their own qualitative research, each presentation focused on a different aspect of pandemic policy and the implications for future response. Topics included analyses of domestic and global contact tracing programs, United States vaccination legislation, and variation within California’s response at the local level. By bringing these three topics and perspectives together through conversation, the presenters hoped to set the stage for the future of comprehensive pandemic policy.

The Georgetown University Global Health Initiative (GHI) and Georgetown Center for Global Health Science and Security (GHSS) co-sponsored this event as part of the Global Health Security Seminar Series.

Featured

Emily Pelles (G'22) is a Master of Public Policy candidate at the McCourt School of Public Policy. Her research interests include public health, food and nutrition, and sustainable agriculture policy.

Kate Toole (SFS'22) is a junior in the Walsh School of Foreign Service studying Science, Technology, and International Affairs (STIA) with a concentration in biotechnology and global health as well as a minor in biology. Her interests include emerging infectious disease, pandemic preparedness, and global health diplomacy.

Krysten Thomas is a J.D. candidate in the evening program at Georgetown Law. Her research focuses on policies related to COVID-19 and HIV/AIDS.